Glow: Take a Trip Back To The Eighties with The Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling

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           One month ago, Netflix released its new series Glow, created by Liz Flahive and Carly Mensc. The story is a fictional story about the 1980s women’s professional wrestling circuit called “The Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling” (or GLOW) orginally created by David McLane. Ruth Wilder, an actress looking for a job, is invited for a secret audition with dozens of women. She later discovers that she could be a potential character in a wrestling show directed by tortured artist Sam Sylvia and has to adapt to this new situation. The series also explores her conflicted relationship with her best friend Debbie Eagan, a former soap opera actress, as Ruth had an affair with her husband.

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         Glow has been already praised by critics – and it is clear why. The series is an amazing trip back to the Flashdance era with numerous references that will take you back to the decade of Rocky, but with a touch of feminism this time around. The eighties have recently become a trend in TV shows. The success of Stranger Things, another Netflix series that sparkled last year, shows that there is a sort of fascination even nostalgia for this period. The eighties revival in fashion has idealised this decade which feels both recent and far from us nowadays. More and more, the eighties seem like a new Golden Hollywood era in which our parents grew up during these years. In Glow, you will rediscover those neon clothes, those fitness courses that won’t appear during your Facebook daily scrolling, and that lacquered hair, exaggerated make-up and funny jeans. Less serious than Stranger Things, Glow is a genuine wink to the dynamic eighties while celebrating feminism.

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         While Sam appears as a sexist and mysognistic artist, he truly changes his mind with his new actresses. The girls all have different shapes, sizes and backgrounds. They are not “perfect” and are eager to know more about wrestling. They don’t consider the activity masculine one and do not hesitate to fight in order to improve what they do. The tension between sexism and feminism explores how the women are perceived and how the Gorgeous Ladies want to dismantle these ideas by performing wrestling. Each of them has a story, a unique personality that you won’t even find in your average eighties movie.

         If you haven’t watch Glow yet, just open your Netflix account and enjoy. Compared to Orange is The New Black by many reviews (Jenji Kohan, creator the series is the executive producer), Glow is a less dark version of the show with similarly incredible women.

3…2…1…Let’s GLOW !

 

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